Home Inspection in Ridgeville, SC

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As the most trusted home inspection company in Ridgeville, I know that purchasing a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. That's why choosing the right home inspector is so important - because you want to know that your new home is in good shape. With PGR Home Inspections, you can be certain you're making the right purchasing decision.

Unlike some home inspectors in Ridgeville, SC, I inspect from attic to crawl and wall to wall, while educating my clients throughout the home inspection process. Because a thorough home inspection ultimately depends on the inspector's dedication and effort, I make it my goal to put forth the maximum amount of effort to keep you aware and informed.

As a certified, licensed professional, I provide all of my clients with an unbiased third-party opinion, regardless of whether they are buyers, sellers, or real estate agents. Once we're finished, I will send you an in-depth, educational inspection report to help you make an educated decision about your sale or purchase.

With PGR Home Inspections on your side, you will build your knowledge and achieve peace of mind during the most stressful times.

Here's how:

  • Investigative home inspection approach
  • Thorough, detailed inspection reports that are returned to you quickly
  • Fully trained, certified and licensed
  • I offer several home inspection services for buyers, sellers, and real estate professionals
  • Easy online scheduling so that you meet your due diligence deadline
  • Competitive pricing
  • Friendly, helpful, and ready to exceed expectations

Service Areas

Home Inspection Ridgeville, SC

What is a home inspection?

Think of a home inspection like an annual check-up at with your doctor. Home inspections are used to ensure that everything is working correctly in your home - from your sinks and appliances to your windows and roof. A great home inspection will help shine a light on concerning issues located inside and outside your home, which may affect your quality of life.

Home inspections are also helpful for spotting potential risks that may cause concern down the line. When we send you your home inspection report, you will have a much better idea of any problems that are present in your home. Included in your report are recommended repairs and suggestions on what actions to take as your home ages.

Because different circumstances require different types of home inspections, we offer several choices to cater to your needs:

General Home Inspections in Ridgeville

You've heard it before - "A man's house is his castle." It is a place of peace, relaxation, and privacy. However, the steps leading up to your new purchase can be exhausting, expensive, and stressful. After all, when you buy a home, you're investing in your family's future. That is why I believe that having an unbiased general home inspection (or buyer's inspection) is an investment all on its own.

Our goal is to keep you informed and aware of all the components in your new home. In fact, I encourage you to be present and ask questions during your inspection. That way, you can walk into your closing with confidence, knowing you are making an informed purchasing decision. When you hire PGR for your general home inspection, know that I am here for YOU. We will spend as much time as needed to explain our findings and answer any questions that you may have about your buyer's home inspection in Ridgeville, SC.

After I have inspected your home from bottom to top, you will receive your report that includes high-quality color photos depicting our findings the same day.  Should you have questions relating to your report, simply give me a call after thoroughly reviewing it. At PGR Home Inspections, I strive to make this an enjoyable, informative experience that expands your knowledge and helps you understand building science.

Our general home inspections include:

  • Unbiased top-to-bottom home evaluation, including hard-to-reach areas like crawlspaces and attics.
  • Confirmation that all your utilities are in working order, like gas, electrical, and water.
  • Verification that your crawlspace is accessible, and all livable areas may be accessed. This includes your electrical panel, water heater, HVAC system, and attic hatch.
  • Reports delivered same day that detail any issues within your house and its systems or components.
  • Free thermal imaging
  • On-site wrap-up with plenty of time to answer your questions

Pre-Listing Home Inspections in Ridgeville, SC

When you're selling your home, few things are as frustrating as a deal falling through due to maintenance issues. All too often, deals fall through because the buyer's inspector finds a significant issue that could have corrected earlier. Having a pre-listing inspection (or a seller's inspection) puts the control back in your hands. With a pre-listing inspection, you can get prepared for your sale by revealing any major defects in your home that need repairing. Having a pre-listing inspection saves you money, time, and reduces your overall stress levels in the long run.

By completing a pre-listing inspection, you can take as much time as you need to decide which repairs will increase your home's value the most. That way, you get the highest return on investment. By making these repairs on your own time, you can sift through several repair estimates and choose the one makes the most sense for your budget.

As you enter negotiations, you may present your pre-listing inspection as a token of good faith to interested buyers. Sharing your seller's inspection with potential buyers lets them get a look at the condition of your home. More importantly, it will let the buyer know how much money and work you have put into fixing your home's defects, which helps warrant your listing price.

If you want to reduce the time it takes for negotiations, save yourself money, and get the best price for your home, a pre-listing home inspection is a wise choice.

The benefits are endless when you hire PGR to complete a seller's inspection:

  • Boost the chances of selling your home at a price that you can feel good about
  • Manage any pre-existing defects or problems
  • Put negotiating power back in your hands during closing
  • Enjoy a smoother closing process
  • Shorten the time it takes for funds to reach escrow

11th Month Home Inspection in Ridgeville, SC

If you're thinking of having a new construction home built, it's easy to understand why. New homes are often more energy-efficient, come with all-new systems and appliances, and can be customized to your exact preferences. Buying a new home also means you won't have to make repairs or deal with the wear and tear that most older homes have. However, new construction homes aren't always perfect. So, when your home is finished, and your builder explains the one-year warranty on their work, it's wise to schedule an 11th month home inspection.

Much like a general home inspection, I take an investigative, non-invasive approach when we inspect your newly built home. I will evaluate all visible and accessible areas of your new construction home to spot any potential issues. I even use thermal imaging at no extra cost to you.

When I have completed your 11th month inspection, you will receive a shorter, comprehensive inspection report with color photos and information on any defects we discover. You may take this valuable information to your builder, who can then make any repairs necessary before your warranty expires. That way, any repairs needed are done on the warranty company's time.

Additional benefits of an 11th month home inspection from PGR include:

 Home Inspector Ridgeville, SC
Fix Defects at No Cost

Homebuilders are aware that new construction homes can have defects. After all, there are many hands involved in building a house, including subcontractors you never meet. Because some flaws aren't obvious during the first year of living in a home, having an 11th month home inspection is a great way to protect yourself and your investment.

Prevent Unwelcome Surprises

When you assume that your newly constructed home is void of defects, you could be setting yourself up for some nasty surprises down the line. For example, issues with your new home's systems might not reveal themselves until they malfunction. You will have to cover repair costs in cases like this because the builder's warranty has already expired. With PGR's 11th month inspections, I will ensure that your home's structure systems work properly. If they're not, you will have ample time to have any defects fixed before your warranty is up.

More Time to File Claims

When you schedule your 11th month home inspection at the start of the last month of your warranty, you will have more time to submit a warranty claim. If you choose to wait until a few days before your warranty expires, you will be rushing to file a claim before your new home's warranty expires.

 Property Inspection Ridgeville, SC

The PGR Home Inspections Difference

At PGR Home Inspections, I am proud to be the most reliable, thorough, unbiased home inspector in Ridgeville, SC. I believe in working hard and treating our customers right, by giving them an in-depth look at their home to make knowledgeable decisions with confidence. I believe in working hard and treating our customers right by giving them an in-depth look at their homes to make knowledgeable decisions with confidence. When you allow me to serve you, I aim to exceed your expectations by inspecting "Attic to Crawl and Wall to Wall", while walking you through our inspection process step-by-step.

Ready to get started?

We're ready to get to work!

Give me a call today at 843-789-0653 with your questions. When you're all set, you can go online to
schedule your Ridgeville home inspection

Latest News in Ridgeville, SC

Data center project planned in Ridgeville, South Carolina

A “significant” data center development is coming to Ridgeville, South Carolina.According to Dominion letters sent to the Public Service Commission of South Carolina, a company called Mallard, LLC is proposing ‘Project Dawson’; a data center development on land near Research Center Drive in Ridgeville, in South Carolina’s Dorchester County.The site, located to the northeast o...

A “significant” data center development is coming to Ridgeville, South Carolina.

According to Dominion letters sent to the Public Service Commission of South Carolina, a company called Mallard, LLC is proposing ‘Project Dawson’; a data center development on land near Research Center Drive in Ridgeville, in South Carolina’s Dorchester County.

The site, located to the northeast of Charleson, will have its own substation. Information about the site’s planned capacity – along with timelines – has been redacted.

Dominion said Mallard was investing a “significant” amount of capital into the project, which will represent a “substantial load” for the energy firm.

As reported by the Post and Courier, the company is being offered a special "economic development rider" rate that amounts to 6 cents for every kilowatt hour of power – half of what residential customers pay.

The SC Public Service Commission has to review any such deals, but is yet to set a meeting date.

John Truluck, Dorchester County's economic development director, told the publication he has not heard of Mallard LLC.

The Post notes the data center's location is the same parcels where a company operating as Autumn Timber LLC previously proposed to invest $510 million on an unspecified development at the Pine Hill Business Campus off Highway 17A.

Autumn Timber previously used ‘Project Dawson’ on a permit application with the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control. Dorchester County Council last month approved tax breaks, a water-service agreement, and a land deal for Autumn Timber – which has previously filed plans under ‘Project Orchid’.

Dorchester County officials previously agreed to sell about 268 acres it owns at Pine Hill Business Campus to Autumn Timber for $5.84 million.

The Post linked Mallard to Google, as the manager of the shell company is one David Thomas. A Google director of corporate strategy named David Thomas has previously been named on other Google-affiliated public documents.

Google currently operates a South Carolina data center campus in Moncks Corner, around 20 miles east of Ridgeville. The company recently acquired another 140 acres in the area.

Elsewhere in South Carolina, a company hiding behind the shell company Starskey LLC is proposing ‘Project Sabal’, which is reportedly a data center development outside Augusta in Graniteville, Aiken County. County officials granted tax incentives to Starskey earlier this year. The company reportedly acquired around 573 acres in the Sage Mill Industrial Park for $19.2 million last year. It's unclear if Starskey/Sabal are linked to Google or Mallard.

Next phase revealed for 1.4M-square-foot Ridgeville industrial center

Childress Klein, the project’s developer, and Altus Equity Group Inc., a real estate sponsor, operator and investment company, said the finalization of securing an $86.5 million loan needed for construction of their industrial project located in the Camp Hall Commerce Park has been arranged with New York Life Real Estate Investors, according to an Altus Equity Group Inc news release.This is said to be one of the largest historical spec build industrial projects within Charleston proper with the Camp Hall Commerce Park Campus 8, ...

Childress Klein, the project’s developer, and Altus Equity Group Inc., a real estate sponsor, operator and investment company, said the finalization of securing an $86.5 million loan needed for construction of their industrial project located in the Camp Hall Commerce Park has been arranged with New York Life Real Estate Investors, according to an Altus Equity Group Inc news release.

This is said to be one of the largest historical spec build industrial projects within Charleston proper with the Camp Hall Commerce Park Campus 8, the next phase of the larger Camp Hall mixed-use park, equaling more than 1.4 million square feet, according to the release.

“While construction started in June of last year, we are pleased to announce the closing of our financing for this project,” said Matt Harper, partner at Childress Klein. “Despite some headwinds in the capital markets, we were able to secure attractive financing through New York Life Real Estate Investors and look forward to working with them to complete construction in the second half of this year.”

Camp Hall has been ranked by “Business Facilities Magazine’s” annual rankings as the No. 7 best industrial park in the nation in 2022 – and the only industrial park to make the list in the Southeast. Moreover, the project’s access to Interstate 26 provides convenient connection to the logistics and distribution capabilities of the Charleston market, including the Port of Charleston and Charleston International Airport, the release said.

“We are extremely excited about this project,” said Andrew Eicher, Altus Equity senior vice president. “Charleston is a strong economic center with growing industrial demand from manufacturing, logistics, and the continued growth of the Port of Charleston. There are many complications in a deal of this size, and we appreciate the attentiveness of the local and state governments to the project. In addition to our trusted local industry relationships, Camp Hall and Santee Cooper were instrumental in working through challenges as they arose during the pre-construction phases.”

Construction started in June upon purchase of the land, which was facilitated by Cushman and Wakefield’s Charleston Office. The Charleston office of Jones Lang LaSalle Inc has been selected as the leasing broker for the project by the combined management team, the release said.

Childress Klein has developed more than 51 million square feet of commercial real estate and owns assets valued at more than $3 billion.

“We continue to see opportunities in construction lending and look forward towards solidifying and expanding our relationships with top tier sponsors such as Childress Klein and Altus," said Elizabeth Roy, New York Life Real Estate Investors’ Structured Debt Team senior director.

Google confirms it is behind Project Dawson data center campus in South Carolina

Google has confirmed it is behind a data center development project in Ridgeville, South CarolinaThe search and cloud company has also received permission to develop three more data centers in Belgium.Google confirmed to expand in South CarolinaGoogle has revealed itself to be behind the Project Dawson data center proposals in South Carolina.“The Dorchester County Economic Development (DCED) office, which serves to support economic growth in the county, confirms a relationship with G...

Google has confirmed it is behind a data center development project in Ridgeville, South Carolina

The search and cloud company has also received permission to develop three more data centers in Belgium.

Google confirmed to expand in South Carolina

Google has revealed itself to be behind the Project Dawson data center proposals in South Carolina.

“The Dorchester County Economic Development (DCED) office, which serves to support economic growth in the county, confirms a relationship with Google who recently closed on property in the county,” the DCED said this week.

“We are thrilled to welcome Google to Dorchester County and know they will be a long-term partner for our community, especially our schools,” said Dorchester County Council Chairman Todd Friddle. “Google has a history of strengthening local workforces and uplifting communities, and we look forward to Google making a positive difference here in Dorchester County.”

Campus specifications or project timelines haven't been shared.

According to the Post and Courier, the company aims to invest $510 million in the new campus – a 231-acre site along Research Center Drive and Highway 17A in Dorchester County’s Pine Hill Business Campus. The Dorchester County Council voted to change the site’s zoning earlier this month.

Google – previously reported as the company likely involved – has previously been conducting business around the project behind the Autumn Timber LLC and Mallard LLC company names. The search company had been referring to the site as Project Dawson.

“We have been proud to call South Carolina home for over fifteen years since we first put down roots in Berkeley County,” Google said in a statement. “Since then, we have partnered closely with local leadership, schools, and nonprofits to lift up the great work happening here. As we look to expand in the state, we have acquired property in Dorchester County for the development of a new data center campus. We look forward to growing our community here in South Carolina and will share details as this long-term project progresses.”

Google currently operates a South Carolina data center campus in Moncks Corner, around 20 miles east of Ridgeville. The company recently acquired another 140 acres in the area.

The Post and Courier also reports that Google, going by the aliases Project Evergreen and Gannett Enterprises LLC, has also is purchasing 206 acres for a proposed third data center near the county's Winding Woods Commerce Park along Pecan Tree Road and Highway 78, outside the town of St. George. The company was granted a $5.55 million purchase option for the land this month.

However, the company reportedly aims to focus on the Pine Hill campus for now, and will expand to the Winding Woods site as demand requires.

Google expands in Belgium

In Belgium, Google has been granted permission for a new data center campus.

The Walloon Region has issued an urban planning permit to the company for the construction of a new data center campus in the Hainaut municipality of Farciennes. The company is reportedly investing €600 million ($646m) in the project.

“The Walloon Region has just granted the permit for the installation of Google in Farcienne,” said Hugues Bayet, mayor of the municipality of Farciennes. “A new step in the realization of the digital giant's welcome in our region and above all the net creation of many jobs!”

Plans for the camps were first announced in July 2023. The campus will span some 53,000 sqm (570,500 sq ft). Previous reports suggested work would begin on the first phase – spanning around 7,500 sqm (80,730 sq ft) – would begin last year and launch in 2025.

More recent press suggests groundbreaking for the first 80MW phase is due to happen later this year.

Google acquired 53 hectares of land in the Ecopôle eco-business park, located across the municipalities of Farciennes, Aiseau-Presles, and Sambreville, in 2019. According to previous reports, energy firm Elia has confirmed that 200-300MW of capacity would be available on the site.

Belgium’s Saint Ghislain was the site of Google’s first data center in Europe. The company has built five data centers at its 90-hectare Saint-Ghislain site since 2009 as well as a solar plant. The company uses the shell company Crystal Computing for much of its dealings in Belgium.

2022 also saw Google acquire a 36-hectare site located in Ecaussinnes, in Hainaut province, in the Feluy industrial zone near La Louvière.

According to Raphael Stokis, a delegated official of the Walloon Region, the conditions attached to the permit will require on-site solar panels. Additionally, 90 percent of the energy consumed on the site must be carbon-free by 2025 and this must even be 95 percent by 2030.

Google will also have to opt for a more sustainable cooling system for the data centers in future – reportedly switching from systems that use water-consuming technology to air-cooling.

Concerns surround number of crashes on I-26 at Ridgeville, Jedburg Rd. exits

BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - On a stretch of Interstate 26 where construction has limited and changed the road temporarily, the number of accidents has significantly increased over the last year.The South Carolina Department of Transportation started construction on Interstate 26 between Exit 187 to State Highway 27 and Exit 194 to Jedburg Road in 2022. The project includes the widening of I-26, interchange improvements and two twin bridge replacements.Since construction began, some Lowcountry drivers say they are concerned a...

BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - On a stretch of Interstate 26 where construction has limited and changed the road temporarily, the number of accidents has significantly increased over the last year.

The South Carolina Department of Transportation started construction on Interstate 26 between Exit 187 to State Highway 27 and Exit 194 to Jedburg Road in 2022. The project includes the widening of I-26, interchange improvements and two twin bridge replacements.

Since construction began, some Lowcountry drivers say they are concerned about the number of crashes and problems the construction has caused.

On February 19, a crash near the construction involving 10 vehicles sent nine people to area hospitals and lanes closed for hours.

“The traffic is horrible. It takes me a good minute to get home when I leave here, and I’m working right across the road,” Michael Arana, who lives and works in the area, says.

Data for I-26 near mile marker 189 between the Ridgeville and Jedburg Road Exits shows a total of 398 crashes in the area in both 2022 to 2023, according to the South Carolina Department of Public Safety.

The total number of collisions in 2022 was 163 with that number continuing to increase to 235 in 2023. Over the last two years, 133 people have been injured in total with four fatal collisions.

South Carolina Highway Patrol Lance Cpl. Nick Pye says drivers need to take the initiative, day in and day out, to understand that driving is the most dangerous thing a normal person would do on a daily basis.

“There are times to where you might make an error, you might make that bad decision to send that text message or drive a little fast. When you’re in a construction zone, your margin for error is going to decrease. It’s not going to be as big as it would be on a normal roadway,” Pye says.

In 2023, the following numbers from the South Carolina Department of Public Safety break down the specifics surrounding the total number of collisions:

Looking at the reason for the collision is also something the department provided along with the previous data. Out of 235 total collisions, 164 involved a motor vehicle, whether it was moving, stopped or parked.

The other collisions involved embankments, moveable objects, guardrails, work zone maintenance equipment, trees and deer.

“Just the other morning, there was a wreck where a car was in the ditch and flipped over right here,” Arana says. “Around that corner, it’s very bad because it’s only two lanes; one going this direction, one going the other.”

“It’s horrible, I mean when you come around that curve, there’s nothing you can do. It’s going to be too late,” he adds.

Concrete barricades block the emergency lane on both sides, creating a tough situation for first responders to reach vehicles involved in accidents.

“A lot of times, there’s something that we have to respond to quickly in order to clear up, to make it safer, to make sure those secondary crashes don’t happen,” Pye says. “We also want to make sure that we provide safety to the workers as well.”

Construction for the project is not expected to be completed until the fall of 2026, which is why Pye says drivers need to remain aware and focused.

“There’s no surprise to when a construction zone is coming up. There’s plenty of signage out there saying, ‘Hey, construction zone two miles ahead,’” Pye says. “We ask that you always limit distractions, make sure you’re doing the speed limit, make sure you got your seat belt on and make sure you don’t drink and drive.”

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Ridgeville residents in historically Black neighborhood push back against development

RIDGEVILLE — There are two ways that families spell the last name Coburn. There's "Coburn" as in Coburn Town Road and there's also "Cobin."Ethel Cooke, a lifelong resident in the predominately Black community, said her parents told her the mix-up probably comes from some of the neighborhood's ancestors who were sharecroppers."They couldn't read or write," she said.So the name was spelled on records however it ended up being pronounced.As Cooke sits, telling stories about the com...

RIDGEVILLE — There are two ways that families spell the last name Coburn. There's "Coburn" as in Coburn Town Road and there's also "Cobin."

Ethel Cooke, a lifelong resident in the predominately Black community, said her parents told her the mix-up probably comes from some of the neighborhood's ancestors who were sharecroppers.

"They couldn't read or write," she said.

So the name was spelled on records however it ended up being pronounced.

As Cooke sits, telling stories about the community of Coburn Town, the one about the names makes her and others smile. It's part of what makes this place special — the shared history — and a symbol of what could be lost as growth starts to transform the area.

"We don't know what's coming," said Elizabeth Crum Huffman, another lifelong resident.

Located off School Street, the Coburn Town community is surrounded by trees, open fields, a railroad track and a closed sawmill. Many of the original Black residents saved money and purchased land in the area following the end of slavery.

Nearly 180 acres surrounding the community were recently approved for rezoning by Dorchester County Council. Those rezoned parcels, including the old Ashley River Lumber Co., will now fall under what the county refers to as commercial light-industrial.

Officials expect it likely will soon hold a warehouse, but no development plans have been approved.

It's one piece of a larger list of changes that highlights Ridgeville as an area of growth. Other indicators include new housing developments, road projects and industrial spaces like the Walmart Distribution Center.

But with a question mark around its future, community members are reflecting even more on what the quiet and familiar community means to them and what it meant to their ancestors who purchased the land to have something of their own.

'We came up the hard way'

Though it's been years since farming was the main source of income in the community, it's still possible to see some of its agricultural roots.

There are open fields that sit on the edges and the rusted fences that used to hold livestock.

Take away the paved roads and some of the home renovations. Picture in its place a couple of wagons, tobacco and potato fields and mules, and it's easy to imagine what the place looked like when Black residents first poured into it.

Walking down Coburn Town Road, Huffman and her sister Virginia Crum said they can remember having to do farming chores as children and just tossing all of the seeds in the field without any order.

Harvest time would usually give them away, they said laughing.

Their father, Willie Kizer Crum Sr., and mother, Hermena Robinson Crum, had 10 children: seven girls and three boys. The couple married in the 1940s. Willie's father was a sharecropper.

Virginia Crum, a retired educator, said their father bought the land they live on now. Some of the things she remembers the most about him is he didn't like buying things on credit and always paid in cash.

Down the street lives James Wesley Duggins Jr., a 78-year-old man who grew up in Coburn Town.

Standing outside working in his yard, he laughed about how annoying the nearby railroad can be with the sound of trains coming through.

His father, James Wesley Duggins Sr., helped build the railroad tracks. "Look now, the machines do all that," Duggins said.

His family moved to the area around the 1920s.

While talking with the sisters, he reminded Crum she integrated Ridgeville Elementary when she was in the first grade. She was born in 1959.

"There's so much history," Crum said.

And while there are tons of happy memories, like playing baseball around some of the farm animals and staying over at each others' houses, the community also remembers how their elders struggled.

There were times as children when they had to run through the woods to avoid White children throwing rocks, Duggins said.

Huffman and Crum's mother often had to travel as far as Charleston to sell goods because the White residents in Ridgeville at the time severely underpaid them, they said.

"We had some strong Black people in the community," Crum said.

Cooke remembers being a child and having a White boy spit at her when they were in town one day.

"I said, 'Daddy, that ain't right,' " Cooke said. Her father, she recalled, encouraged her to let it go for her own safety.

She also remembers sitting outside and working in a yard for a family for whom her grandmother cooked and cleaned. She wasn't allowed to come inside the home.

After working in the yard, Cooke laughed and said all she got for it was an orange dress. "And it had a hole in it," she said.

She said she can't imagine what her grandmother was paid.

"We came up the hard way," Cooke said.

There was a time when everyone in their community was a Coburn-Cobin. But with different marriages, other names started to appear.

Two of Crum and Huffman's aunts married into the Coburn-Cobin family. One of the aunts married Cooke's grandfather.

Outside of marriages, they said, the community has always felt like one big family that supported each other.

When Cooke's family was struggling when she was raised, she said, Huffman and Crum's father would routinely give them potatoes to help them get by.

No one really knew or talked about it.

"Now you borrow sugar and the whole city would know it," Cooke said.

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A growing town

On Nov. 1, as 180 acres surrounding Coburn Town was rezoned to commercial-light industrial, community members and descendants poured in to raise their concerns.

Many noted the things they wanted to see. Crum emphasized helping the schools and adding facilities like health and community centers. Huffman said she would love to see more sidewalks because she enjoys a daily walk.

Tim Lewis and Felicia Cobin can trace their history in the area as far back as 1829. Rebecca Cobin was buried near the community in the late 1940s. She was born in 1883.

"We really want to look at how we can grow together," Lewis said. "There's history here."

Business

Ridgeville's growth has been a big topic in the past couple of years. Federal funds around COVID-19 relief will bring $6.8 million in roadway improvements around the Ridgeville Industrial Campus.

At the same campus, a Walmart Distribution Center is slated to bring hundreds of jobs to the area, increasing truck traffic.

The county is also expanding water access. Many Coburn Town residents use wells.

Boom & Balance

In conjunction with new housing developments, there's a lot more movement in the Ridgeville area.

Dorchester County Councilman David Chinnis said many things the community wants depend on rooftops. No development plans have been approved around the rezoned property near Coburn Town.

"We don't know what's being built there," Chinnis said.

He encouraged residents to continue their involvement. But whatever comes, he said, the goal would be to protect the community with features like buffers.

The county is also looking to start working on a Ridgeville/Givhans Area Growth Management Plan. The plan has one more layer of council approval to go through before work can start on creating it.

The goal with the plan is to raise awareness about infrastructure concerns and funding. Local community members hope to be a part of the planning process. "Understand that this community is growing," Chinnis said.

And while a lot of the area community members are still wary, many said they still plan to keep pressing on the council to protect the community.

The unknown

Feelings around growth in Coburn Town are mixed.

Some are nervous with the uncertainty about what's to come and what it means about preserving their land and history.

“I was able to share that history with my children,” said Taneeka Wright.

Her grandfather, John Henry Pinckney, was a welder and mechanic who lived in Coburn Town. Her grandmother, Ethel Mae Pinkney, was a cook.

She said she enjoyed showing her children around the community and how she grew up. She remembers having to invent games with friends and families because there weren't a lot of things to play with.

“And I would love to share that history with my grandchildren," she said.

Others in the community are pessimistic and said they know significant change is inevitable.

"It's not going to be the same anymore," said Franklin Pinckney, a lifelong resident and a local high school football star at the old Harley-Ridgeville High School.

All he said he remembers now are the body aches.

Boom & Balance

"It's not going to be the same anymore," he said thinking about the future and the thought of hearing loud trucks and movement in a community that tends to be quiet and slow.

One resident said he doesn't have any fear.

"I like to try and be real," said Wendell Coburn, 81.

Coburn manages his dementia and lives with his wife Betty, 71. With his condition, Betty is still able to communicate with him and help him have conversations with people.

Community members said he might struggle with the present but he can still hold conversations about the past.

Wendell built their Coburn Town Road home more than 40 years ago. He was raised by a single mother who had to walk 3 miles to work.

He's known in the community as being someone who was always willing to lend a helping hand without even being asked. Residents said the influence of his mother and the community is all over him. "They preserved him for me," Betty said with a laugh.

She married into the community.

To Wendell, community connection and talking with people are important. He describes Corburn Town as a community of caring.

When asked to spell his last name, Wendell makes sure people know it's with the "urn" and not the "in."

"If you can't communicate with people, you're doing nothing," he said.

In a 1900 census interview of Ransom Coburn it points to the Coburn-Cobin family origin being in Virginia around the Jamestown area.

The descendants believe they came to South Carolina either for work collecting turpentine or constructing the railroads.

Reach Jerrel Floyd at 843-937-5558. Follow him on Twitter @jfloyd134.

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