Home Inspection in Mount Pleasant, SC

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As the most trusted home inspection company in Mount Pleasant, I know that purchasing a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. That's why choosing the right home inspector is so important - because you want to know that your new home is in good shape. With PGR Home Inspections, you can be certain you're making the right purchasing decision.

Unlike some home inspectors in Mount Pleasant, SC, I inspect from attic to crawl and wall to wall, while educating my clients throughout the home inspection process. Because a thorough home inspection ultimately depends on the inspector's dedication and effort, I make it my goal to put forth the maximum amount of effort to keep you aware and informed.

As a certified, licensed professional, I provide all of my clients with an unbiased third-party opinion, regardless of whether they are buyers, sellers, or real estate agents. Once we're finished, I will send you an in-depth, educational inspection report to help you make an educated decision about your sale or purchase.

With PGR Home Inspections on your side, you will build your knowledge and achieve peace of mind during the most stressful times.

Here's how:

  • Investigative home inspection approach
  • Thorough, detailed inspection reports that are returned to you quickly
  • Fully trained, certified and licensed
  • I offer several home inspection services for buyers, sellers, and real estate professionals
  • Easy online scheduling so that you meet your due diligence deadline
  • Competitive pricing
  • Friendly, helpful, and ready to exceed expectations

Service Areas

Home Inspection Mount Pleasant, SC

What is a home inspection?

Think of a home inspection like an annual check-up at with your doctor. Home inspections are used to ensure that everything is working correctly in your home - from your sinks and appliances to your windows and roof. A great home inspection will help shine a light on concerning issues located inside and outside your home, which may affect your quality of life.

Home inspections are also helpful for spotting potential risks that may cause concern down the line. When we send you your home inspection report, you will have a much better idea of any problems that are present in your home. Included in your report are recommended repairs and suggestions on what actions to take as your home ages.

Because different circumstances require different types of home inspections, we offer several choices to cater to your needs:

General Home Inspections in Mount Pleasant

You've heard it before - "A man's house is his castle." It is a place of peace, relaxation, and privacy. However, the steps leading up to your new purchase can be exhausting, expensive, and stressful. After all, when you buy a home, you're investing in your family's future. That is why I believe that having an unbiased general home inspection (or buyer's inspection) is an investment all on its own.

Our goal is to keep you informed and aware of all the components in your new home. In fact, I encourage you to be present and ask questions during your inspection. That way, you can walk into your closing with confidence, knowing you are making an informed purchasing decision. When you hire PGR for your general home inspection, know that I am here for YOU. We will spend as much time as needed to explain our findings and answer any questions that you may have about your buyer's home inspection in Mount Pleasant, SC.

After I have inspected your home from bottom to top, you will receive your report that includes high-quality color photos depicting our findings the same day.  Should you have questions relating to your report, simply give me a call after thoroughly reviewing it. At PGR Home Inspections, I strive to make this an enjoyable, informative experience that expands your knowledge and helps you understand building science.

Our general home inspections include:

  • Unbiased top-to-bottom home evaluation, including hard-to-reach areas like crawlspaces and attics.
  • Confirmation that all your utilities are in working order, like gas, electrical, and water.
  • Verification that your crawlspace is accessible, and all livable areas may be accessed. This includes your electrical panel, water heater, HVAC system, and attic hatch.
  • Reports delivered same day that detail any issues within your house and its systems or components.
  • Free thermal imaging
  • On-site wrap-up with plenty of time to answer your questions

Pre-Listing Home Inspections in Mount Pleasant, SC

When you're selling your home, few things are as frustrating as a deal falling through due to maintenance issues. All too often, deals fall through because the buyer's inspector finds a significant issue that could have corrected earlier. Having a pre-listing inspection (or a seller's inspection) puts the control back in your hands. With a pre-listing inspection, you can get prepared for your sale by revealing any major defects in your home that need repairing. Having a pre-listing inspection saves you money, time, and reduces your overall stress levels in the long run.

By completing a pre-listing inspection, you can take as much time as you need to decide which repairs will increase your home's value the most. That way, you get the highest return on investment. By making these repairs on your own time, you can sift through several repair estimates and choose the one makes the most sense for your budget.

As you enter negotiations, you may present your pre-listing inspection as a token of good faith to interested buyers. Sharing your seller's inspection with potential buyers lets them get a look at the condition of your home. More importantly, it will let the buyer know how much money and work you have put into fixing your home's defects, which helps warrant your listing price.

If you want to reduce the time it takes for negotiations, save yourself money, and get the best price for your home, a pre-listing home inspection is a wise choice.

The benefits are endless when you hire PGR to complete a seller's inspection:

  • Boost the chances of selling your home at a price that you can feel good about
  • Manage any pre-existing defects or problems
  • Put negotiating power back in your hands during closing
  • Enjoy a smoother closing process
  • Shorten the time it takes for funds to reach escrow

11th Month Home Inspection in Mount Pleasant, SC

If you're thinking of having a new construction home built, it's easy to understand why. New homes are often more energy-efficient, come with all-new systems and appliances, and can be customized to your exact preferences. Buying a new home also means you won't have to make repairs or deal with the wear and tear that most older homes have. However, new construction homes aren't always perfect. So, when your home is finished, and your builder explains the one-year warranty on their work, it's wise to schedule an 11th month home inspection.

Much like a general home inspection, I take an investigative, non-invasive approach when we inspect your newly built home. I will evaluate all visible and accessible areas of your new construction home to spot any potential issues. I even use thermal imaging at no extra cost to you.

When I have completed your 11th month inspection, you will receive a shorter, comprehensive inspection report with color photos and information on any defects we discover. You may take this valuable information to your builder, who can then make any repairs necessary before your warranty expires. That way, any repairs needed are done on the warranty company's time.

Additional benefits of an 11th month home inspection from PGR include:

 Home Inspector Mount Pleasant, SC
Fix Defects at No Cost

Homebuilders are aware that new construction homes can have defects. After all, there are many hands involved in building a house, including subcontractors you never meet. Because some flaws aren't obvious during the first year of living in a home, having an 11th month home inspection is a great way to protect yourself and your investment.

Prevent Unwelcome Surprises

When you assume that your newly constructed home is void of defects, you could be setting yourself up for some nasty surprises down the line. For example, issues with your new home's systems might not reveal themselves until they malfunction. You will have to cover repair costs in cases like this because the builder's warranty has already expired. With PGR's 11th month inspections, I will ensure that your home's structure systems work properly. If they're not, you will have ample time to have any defects fixed before your warranty is up.

More Time to File Claims

When you schedule your 11th month home inspection at the start of the last month of your warranty, you will have more time to submit a warranty claim. If you choose to wait until a few days before your warranty expires, you will be rushing to file a claim before your new home's warranty expires.

 Property Inspection Mount Pleasant, SC

The PGR Home Inspections Difference

At PGR Home Inspections, I am proud to be the most reliable, thorough, unbiased home inspector in Mount Pleasant, SC. I believe in working hard and treating our customers right, by giving them an in-depth look at their home to make knowledgeable decisions with confidence. I believe in working hard and treating our customers right by giving them an in-depth look at their homes to make knowledgeable decisions with confidence. When you allow me to serve you, I aim to exceed your expectations by inspecting "Attic to Crawl and Wall to Wall", while walking you through our inspection process step-by-step.

Ready to get started?

We're ready to get to work!

Give me a call today at 843-789-0653 with your questions. When you're all set, you can go online to
schedule your Mount Pleasant home inspection

Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Mount Pleasant to expand attainable housing options

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Twelve acres of land along Park Avenue Boulevard in Mount Pleasant could soon be the site of a proposed attainable housing complex.“It is in the perfect place in Mount Pleasant ‘cause there’s six schools around there, t...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Twelve acres of land along Park Avenue Boulevard in Mount Pleasant could soon be the site of a proposed attainable housing complex.

“It is in the perfect place in Mount Pleasant ‘cause there’s six schools around there, two fire stations, we’re getting ready to build a public services facility at Lieben Road, the hospital is there, and major retailers like Costco,” explained Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie.

Next week town council will vote on the first reading of amending the Carolina Park Planned Development document to allow for attainable housing at that location.

The mayor said the proposed homes will be in the $300-400,000 price range and will be available for purchase, not rent. To qualify, he said future homeowners will need to fall within a certain percentage of the area median income.

“This is our first responders, our teachers, our healthcare workers. And to be a healthy and complete community, we need to welcome people like that instead of excluding them by the $1 million average home sale price we had last month,” Mayor Haynie said.

The parcel was purchased by Seacoast Church years ago for a second Mount Pleasant campus, but Glenn Wood, the administrator for the church, said they realized it wasn’t the right fit.

After receiving multiple offers, he said they decided to sell it to an attainable housing developer.

“We just feel like it’s a great opportunity for the town to be able to have housing that teachers, fire departments, nurses, you know and honestly even our staff ‘cause some of our staff has to live outside of Mount Pleasant and commute in just because of the cost of real estate,” Wood said. “And so, its an opportunity, we felt like for the town to be able to have some attainable housing and you know I think it’s a great use of the land and a great opportunity.

Prosperity Builders, the developer of the project, already has another attainable housing project in Mount Pleasant called Gregorie Ferry Towns.

Mayor Haynie said if the plan passes the necessary steps, they could break ground as soon as the summer.

Meet the candidates: Mark Flannery

Tell me about your professional background and how you feel it makes you a good fit to be a council member.I've been teaching in Charleston County since 2016. This is my 24th year teaching. The local aspect of teaching, most of my career has been in teaching elementary school, but still the local aspect of working in the community where I live has always been something that I really like. Now I'm in North Charleston, so it's the greater community where I live. I think this is a theme of why I've chosen to run for Town...

Tell me about your professional background and how you feel it makes you a good fit to be a council member.

I've been teaching in Charleston County since 2016. This is my 24th year teaching. The local aspect of teaching, most of my career has been in teaching elementary school, but still the local aspect of working in the community where I live has always been something that I really like. Now I'm in North Charleston, so it's the greater community where I live. I think this is a theme of why I've chosen to run for Town Council because I would like to see Mount Pleasant make its own decisions on a local level and be responsible for them and with citizens participating in the process. I lived in France for seven years and I have a Bachelor of Science in French and psychology and a master's degree in educational technology. I've just always been part of the local community and have worked well with others.

What do you feel is the biggest issue facing the town today, and what plans do you have to address this?

I have a daughter, a six-year-old, and we went to James Island yesterday to go rock climbing in James Island County Park. I would like to see the green spaces improved in Mount Pleasant to make it something where travelers don't have to go across town to go to the (County) Park. I know that there’s a bike path in … Laurel Hill County Park and just a dirt road going in a half-mile circle and there are things that we can put back there that would be places you can take your kids and take your family.

The other thing is I think that health all across the United States is a problem. We pay more for healthcare. We have more healthcare issues related to obesity and diet. I would like to be somebody who spreads the message of healthy eating and healthy lifestyles lead to better lives. We have a great little local market there at Boone Hall...we have the Farmers Market on Tuesday and Boone Hall is open the rest of the week.

The results of the Public Input Matters survey found that throughout all seven districts in town, respondents feel that traffic in Mount Pleasant needs to be improved. What are some concrete solutions that you feel can address this?

The traffic in Mount Pleasant and housing in Mount Pleasant — I don’t know if ‘victims of our own success’ is the right word for it. We have a very unique geography here. We are a virtual island in that there's no shortcuts. There's one way in and one way out. You may come across I-526 or I-26 or you go north towards McClellanville and Georgetown up (Highway) 41. There just isn't room.

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I know that the Town Council has a plan and they've already hired a company to look into certain traffic solutions. As a new council member, I'm not sure if I would be able to offer anything different to what they have already decided on.

Another area Public Input Matters survey takers responded to was housing availability. Forty-one percent of respondents felt that affordable housing options should be increased. How do you feel this can be accomplished?

I think it speaks well to the people in Mount Pleasant that we want things for people like affordable housing, but whether or not there is a feasible solution to providing that affordable housing — where are we going to put affordable housing? It makes sense that people want affordable housing but do they want the affordable housing in their backyard?

I want to live locally, I want to buy locally, want to shop locally, but we can't escape the fact that a lot of our local decisions are made on a state and national and global level. How does Mount Pleasant make affordable housing when the interest rates are 7.75 percent? There are things happening on a national level that we just can't control that can make our job of creating affordable housing next to impossible.

Is there anyone who has served as a role model to you, either from politics, past experiences or family members, that you look to and consider while you run for office?

One thing my dad always taught us was sometimes doing the right thing is the hardest thing to do, but you can take solace in the fact that it's the right thing to do. I am a part owner of a restaurant in Washington, D.C. with my brother Eric and when Washington D.C. decided to impose the vaccine mandate on restaurants … we were the only restaurant in Washington, D.C. to actively say no, we're not going to check people's health papers. It was very hard on my brother to do that, and he's such a big part of the local community. What I just really admired was his courage and even though it financially wasn't the best decision. Financially, it wasn't a great decision, but it was the right decision to make and his principles are something that I truly admire and I try to follow that example in my own life.

Get carried away at newly-opened southern market in Mount Pleasant

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Get carried away at Mount Pleasant’s new southern market and eatery!Located in the heart of town, Get Carried Away offers everything you need whether it’s a delicious grab-and-go meal or stylish glassware for your next dinner party.Happening Saturday, Feb. 3rd, the store will celebrate its grand opening of ‘The Perch,’ their outdoor patio and your new favorite hangout spot for an afternoon spritz and sandwich.We caught up with the owners, Sassy and Brian He...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Get carried away at Mount Pleasant’s new southern market and eatery!

Located in the heart of town, Get Carried Away offers everything you need whether it’s a delicious grab-and-go meal or stylish glassware for your next dinner party.

Happening Saturday, Feb. 3rd, the store will celebrate its grand opening of ‘The Perch,’ their outdoor patio and your new favorite hangout spot for an afternoon spritz and sandwich.

We caught up with the owners, Sassy and Brian Henry, to learn more about their business ahead of this weekend’s celebration.

“A lot of what we do is entertaining and hosting,” said owner, Brian. The idea for the shop has been derived from their love for food, hosting, and entertaining family and friends.

Get Carried Away’s first location was founded in Pawleys Island, but the Henrys decided to expand services to reach a larger audience. “We felt like Mount Pleasant was a comfortable jump,” Sassy said.

The Henrys want to accommodate Charleston’s vacationers and local folks.

Sassy went on to say, “When people are on vacation and going to the beach, they don’t want to have to cook entertaining-type foods for large groups of people.”

The market offers a variety of items for the typical vacationer to pick up on their way to the beach house or for the everyday locals to sip and shop.

Not only does Get Carried Away offer takeaway meals and a wide selection of beer and wine, but you can also find everyday groceries there such as meat, seafood, fruits, dips, milk, eggs, and so on. And of course, you can’t miss out on their famous chicken salad or pimento cheese!

You can get carried away in their home section, too, if you’re not careful. It features gorgeous glassware, decorative napkins, kitchen towels, candles, and much more! “We’re trying to keep it all food and beverage oriented,” Sassy mentioned about the products featured in the home section. It’s worth checking out if you’re looking to elevate your tablescape.

The fun doesn’t stop there! You and your family can join the Henrys on Saturday, Feb. 3rd from 12:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. for the grand opening of ‘The Perch,’ their outdoor patio and bar. The celebration will include a complimentary Lowcountry boil as well as their homemade crowd-pleaser appetizers.

‘The Perch’ will provide a full lunch and drink menu this spring with specialty cocktails: The Perch Punch, Coleman Cosmo, Old Village Fashioned, and the Moultrie Margarita.

Get Carried Away is located at 644 Coleman Boulevard in Mount Pleasant. They’re open from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday and closed on Sundays.

Mount Pleasant plans to limit home building permits until 2029 in effort to slow growth

MOUNT PLEASANT — In an ongoing backlash to years of soaring population growth and traffic complaints, this affluent suburb plans to extend ...

MOUNT PLEASANT — In an ongoing backlash to years of soaring population growth and traffic complaints, this affluent suburb plans to extend strict limits on building permits for another five years.

Just 600 new residences would be permitted yearly in the town of more than 94,000 people, and the actual number would likely be lower.

The yearslong effort to slow residential development by capping building permits is a step no other municipality in South Carolina has taken, but few have experienced growth like Mount Pleasant. The town's population has roughly doubled since 2000 and tripled since 1990.

“There was concern in the community about our infrastructure being able to keep up with the growth rate, and I don’t think that concern has gone away," said Councilwoman G.M. Whitley, who put the permit limit extension before Town Council in November.

The measure is scheduled for a Planning Commission hearing Dec. 13, with a final Town Council vote expected in January. The "building permit allocation system" has been in place nearly five years, and instead of expiring in early 2024, it would be extended to 2029.

It's among many steps the town has taken to thwart rapid growth. There's also a moratorium on new apartment construction that's been in place for seven years, zoning rules have been changed to limit building height and density, and development impact fees were increased dramatically.

In 2018, the year before the permit caps began, the town saw 1,407 new dwelling units — houses, apartments, townhouses and other types of residences. Last year, there were 759.

The permit limits were aimed at slowing the town's annual growth rate for residences from more than 3 percent to a target of 2.1 percent. The result was a growth rate even lower, marked by a low of 1.29 percent in 2020 when just 520 new residences were built.

Mount Pleasant's ordinance in 2019 laid out justifications for limiting building permits, and nearly five years later those have not changed.

The ordinance to extend the permit limits uses the same language, which says "the effects of significant growth are apparent and have resulted not only in increased traffic, congestion and noise, but have also burdened the services.." and "...the town’s road system is barely capable of adequately handling current traffic..."

The permit rules are particularly strict when it comes to higher density multi-family construction, such as apartments and condos. Just 500 new multi-family residences would be allowed over five years, while 2,400 single-family homes could be permitted.

Perhaps surprisingly, despite the limits in place since 2019, hundreds of single-family-home permits went unclaimed.

“Right now we have in excess of 800-900 single-family permits," said Michele Reed, the town's planning director.

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Real estate professionals said a lack of developable land in Mount Pleasant and the high cost of any land available help explain why hundreds of permits to build houses were not used.

“Mount Pleasant, in a lot of ways, is near build-out," said Josh Dix, government affairs director for the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors. "There’s not a lot of opportunity for single-family."

Real Estate

If the town were to annex more properties, that could change. The town is currently in a lawsuit over rules that require property owners to become part of the town in order to get the water and sewer service needed for development.

The suit was filed by owners of a 185-acre tract on the Wando River, known as the Republic tract.

If it were to be developed in the town, Mount Pleasant's impact fees would apply and permit limits would allow just 25 new homes per developer every six months. If it could be developed as an unincorporated part of Charleston County, town officials have said the county's zoning would allow about 1,600 homes.

So, Mount Pleasant is mostly built-out, but that could change.

In the current permit-limiting plan that started in 2019, all but 10 of the 500 multi-family permits were claimed, as were all 100 of the permits allowed for accessory dwellings — generally small second homes on the same property as a primary home.

Mount Pleasant News

Unclaimed permits will not roll over into the next proposed 5-year program. And as with the current program, there would be limits on how many single-family permits could be obtained every six months.

Drew Grossklauss, a Mount Pleasant realtor who became president of the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors in November, said he understands the town needs to address growth but the length of the permit limit extension seems unnecessary.

“I would say five years seems like an extreme to do something," he said.

There are exceptions to the permit caps. The two developments that have ongoing agreements with the town, Carolina Park and Liberty Hill Farm, are exempt, as are developments of affordable housing.

Real Estate

During the last five years, there was one townhouse development, Gregorie Ferry Towns, that qualified for the affordable housing exception — townhomes started at $279,000 — but real estate professionals doubt private developers could create more.

"The cost of land, the cost of construction — all these things add up," said Dix. He said allowing more permits for multi-family housing could help create more affordable housing.

“There is a lot of talk from realtors that if we build a lot of multi-family housing, Mount Pleasant would be more affordable, but I think that’s not true," said Whitley. "They will charge what the market will bear."

Editorial: This must be Mount Pleasant's last extension of apartment moratorium

Mount Pleasant seems certain to extend its moratorium on new apartments yet again. This needs to be the last time — and it needs to be lifted as soon as the town's new zoning regulations are in place.We agree with Mayor Will Haynie, who has supported these moratoriums while also acknowledging that they represent a sort of ...

Mount Pleasant seems certain to extend its moratorium on new apartments yet again. This needs to be the last time — and it needs to be lifted as soon as the town's new zoning regulations are in place.

We agree with Mayor Will Haynie, who has supported these moratoriums while also acknowledging that they represent a sort of failure of local government. Specifically, they reflect a failure of earlier town leaders to ensure that new apartments are built in the right place and with the necessary public infrastructure to support them — and to minimize any negative impacts on existing residents.

But the moratorium also reflects a failure of Town Council to consider those who work in the town and who want to live there but cannot afford to. While the vast majority of Mount Pleasant residents moved to the town, they have supported political candidates who have vowed to make it increasingly difficult and costly for others to do the same. The moratorium has limited new construction and housing supply, helping to drive up both home prices and rental rates. This needs to change.

Almost a decade ago, new apartment projects bothered town voters enough to create a political backlash that ushered in a wave of new council members and, in 2017, the first moratorium on apartments. Since then, the town has regularly renewed the ban, and it worked gradually to revise its comprehensive plan and currently is working to update its zoning and land use regulations to match that plan. The work is expected to finish up in less than a year, after which the moratorium should cease.

It's not just about the need to build more housing; trying to extend it any longer could result in a costly lawsuit for the town. "We knew all along that if we got challenged in court, it would be an uphill battle for us to win," Mr. Haynie tells us. "You have to tie it (the moratorium) to some future occurrence. You can’t just put a moratorium on apartments because we don’t like them." In fact, Mount Pleasant's approximately 8-year-long apartment moratorium might have set a South Carolina record.

Town Council should urge its staff to prioritize updating the code; we see no reason it shouldn't be approved by late summer. Even after the moratorium expires, developers still will see new limits on certain types of residential projects under the town’s building permit allocation system, which limits the number of permits available for single-family housing and multifamily housing developments for several more years. But if Town Council gets this code rewrite right, it also should consider lifting or loosening those permit caps.

Congested roads and overcrowded schools and the loss of forestland and open space have driven these anti-growth measures, but the lack of affordable housing — particularly for those who work in Mount Pleasant's schools, fire stations, hospitals and businesses — is emerging as an equal or even greater concern. And these problems are interrelated: The more people there are who have to commute to Mount Pleasant from Goose Creek, Summerville, Moncks Corner and elsewhere, the worse the traffic.

One thing the town has gotten right is its exemption of multifamily projects with an affordable component from the moratorium. But that has not been enough, particularly as Mount Pleasant has not subsidized such projects to nearly the degree that Charleston has.

The growing problem of too little affordable housing is not a problem only in Mount Pleasant; it's a regional problem. But it's a problem every government in our region must do what it can to solve.

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