Home Inspection in Isle of Palms, SC

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As the most trusted home inspection company in Isle of Palms, I know that purchasing a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. That's why choosing the right home inspector is so important - because you want to know that your new home is in good shape. With PGR Home Inspections, you can be certain you're making the right purchasing decision.

Unlike some home inspectors in Isle of Palms, SC, I inspect from attic to crawl and wall to wall, while educating my clients throughout the home inspection process. Because a thorough home inspection ultimately depends on the inspector's dedication and effort, I make it my goal to put forth the maximum amount of effort to keep you aware and informed.

As a certified, licensed professional, I provide all of my clients with an unbiased third-party opinion, regardless of whether they are buyers, sellers, or real estate agents. Once we're finished, I will send you an in-depth, educational inspection report to help you make an educated decision about your sale or purchase.

With PGR Home Inspections on your side, you will build your knowledge and achieve peace of mind during the most stressful times.

Here's how:

  • Investigative home inspection approach
  • Thorough, detailed inspection reports that are returned to you quickly
  • Fully trained, certified and licensed
  • I offer several home inspection services for buyers, sellers, and real estate professionals
  • Easy online scheduling so that you meet your due diligence deadline
  • Competitive pricing
  • Friendly, helpful, and ready to exceed expectations

Service Areas

Home Inspection Isle Of Palms, SC

What is a home inspection?

Think of a home inspection like an annual check-up at with your doctor. Home inspections are used to ensure that everything is working correctly in your home - from your sinks and appliances to your windows and roof. A great home inspection will help shine a light on concerning issues located inside and outside your home, which may affect your quality of life.

Home inspections are also helpful for spotting potential risks that may cause concern down the line. When we send you your home inspection report, you will have a much better idea of any problems that are present in your home. Included in your report are recommended repairs and suggestions on what actions to take as your home ages.

Because different circumstances require different types of home inspections, we offer several choices to cater to your needs:

General Home Inspections in Isle of Palms

You've heard it before - "A man's house is his castle." It is a place of peace, relaxation, and privacy. However, the steps leading up to your new purchase can be exhausting, expensive, and stressful. After all, when you buy a home, you're investing in your family's future. That is why I believe that having an unbiased general home inspection (or buyer's inspection) is an investment all on its own.

Our goal is to keep you informed and aware of all the components in your new home. In fact, I encourage you to be present and ask questions during your inspection. That way, you can walk into your closing with confidence, knowing you are making an informed purchasing decision. When you hire PGR for your general home inspection, know that I am here for YOU. We will spend as much time as needed to explain our findings and answer any questions that you may have about your buyer's home inspection in Isle of Palms, SC.

After I have inspected your home from bottom to top, you will receive your report that includes high-quality color photos depicting our findings the same day.  Should you have questions relating to your report, simply give me a call after thoroughly reviewing it. At PGR Home Inspections, I strive to make this an enjoyable, informative experience that expands your knowledge and helps you understand building science.

Our general home inspections include:

  • Unbiased top-to-bottom home evaluation, including hard-to-reach areas like crawlspaces and attics.
  • Confirmation that all your utilities are in working order, like gas, electrical, and water.
  • Verification that your crawlspace is accessible, and all livable areas may be accessed. This includes your electrical panel, water heater, HVAC system, and attic hatch.
  • Reports delivered same day that detail any issues within your house and its systems or components.
  • Free thermal imaging
  • On-site wrap-up with plenty of time to answer your questions

Pre-Listing Home Inspections in Isle of Palms, SC

When you're selling your home, few things are as frustrating as a deal falling through due to maintenance issues. All too often, deals fall through because the buyer's inspector finds a significant issue that could have corrected earlier. Having a pre-listing inspection (or a seller's inspection) puts the control back in your hands. With a pre-listing inspection, you can get prepared for your sale by revealing any major defects in your home that need repairing. Having a pre-listing inspection saves you money, time, and reduces your overall stress levels in the long run.

By completing a pre-listing inspection, you can take as much time as you need to decide which repairs will increase your home's value the most. That way, you get the highest return on investment. By making these repairs on your own time, you can sift through several repair estimates and choose the one makes the most sense for your budget.

As you enter negotiations, you may present your pre-listing inspection as a token of good faith to interested buyers. Sharing your seller's inspection with potential buyers lets them get a look at the condition of your home. More importantly, it will let the buyer know how much money and work you have put into fixing your home's defects, which helps warrant your listing price.

If you want to reduce the time it takes for negotiations, save yourself money, and get the best price for your home, a pre-listing home inspection is a wise choice.

The benefits are endless when you hire PGR to complete a seller's inspection:

  • Boost the chances of selling your home at a price that you can feel good about
  • Manage any pre-existing defects or problems
  • Put negotiating power back in your hands during closing
  • Enjoy a smoother closing process
  • Shorten the time it takes for funds to reach escrow

11th Month Home Inspection in Isle of Palms, SC

If you're thinking of having a new construction home built, it's easy to understand why. New homes are often more energy-efficient, come with all-new systems and appliances, and can be customized to your exact preferences. Buying a new home also means you won't have to make repairs or deal with the wear and tear that most older homes have. However, new construction homes aren't always perfect. So, when your home is finished, and your builder explains the one-year warranty on their work, it's wise to schedule an 11th month home inspection.

Much like a general home inspection, I take an investigative, non-invasive approach when we inspect your newly built home. I will evaluate all visible and accessible areas of your new construction home to spot any potential issues. I even use thermal imaging at no extra cost to you.

When I have completed your 11th month inspection, you will receive a shorter, comprehensive inspection report with color photos and information on any defects we discover. You may take this valuable information to your builder, who can then make any repairs necessary before your warranty expires. That way, any repairs needed are done on the warranty company's time.

Additional benefits of an 11th month home inspection from PGR include:

 Home Inspector Isle Of Palms, SC
Fix Defects at No Cost

Homebuilders are aware that new construction homes can have defects. After all, there are many hands involved in building a house, including subcontractors you never meet. Because some flaws aren't obvious during the first year of living in a home, having an 11th month home inspection is a great way to protect yourself and your investment.

Prevent Unwelcome Surprises

When you assume that your newly constructed home is void of defects, you could be setting yourself up for some nasty surprises down the line. For example, issues with your new home's systems might not reveal themselves until they malfunction. You will have to cover repair costs in cases like this because the builder's warranty has already expired. With PGR's 11th month inspections, I will ensure that your home's structure systems work properly. If they're not, you will have ample time to have any defects fixed before your warranty is up.

More Time to File Claims

When you schedule your 11th month home inspection at the start of the last month of your warranty, you will have more time to submit a warranty claim. If you choose to wait until a few days before your warranty expires, you will be rushing to file a claim before your new home's warranty expires.

 Property Inspection Isle Of Palms, SC

The PGR Home Inspections Difference

At PGR Home Inspections, I am proud to be the most reliable, thorough, unbiased home inspector in Isle of Palms, SC. I believe in working hard and treating our customers right, by giving them an in-depth look at their home to make knowledgeable decisions with confidence. I believe in working hard and treating our customers right by giving them an in-depth look at their homes to make knowledgeable decisions with confidence. When you allow me to serve you, I aim to exceed your expectations by inspecting "Attic to Crawl and Wall to Wall", while walking you through our inspection process step-by-step.

Ready to get started?

We're ready to get to work!

Give me a call today at 843-789-0653 with your questions. When you're all set, you can go online to
schedule your Isle of Palms home inspection

Latest News in Isle of Palms, SC

Isle of Palms noise ordinance up for discussion after questions from businesses

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - Big changes could be coming to the noise ordinance on Isle of Palms as city leaders hope to make the rules more clear.The city’s noise ordinance currently doesn’t list specific limits. A proposal would establish set decibel levels based on the time and day of the week as well as the area:Isle of Palms business owners got the chance to see the numbers and ask questions on Friday.“We want them to understand that they have a voice, we want to hear from them,” Police Chief...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - Big changes could be coming to the noise ordinance on Isle of Palms as city leaders hope to make the rules more clear.

The city’s noise ordinance currently doesn’t list specific limits. A proposal would establish set decibel levels based on the time and day of the week as well as the area:

Isle of Palms business owners got the chance to see the numbers and ask questions on Friday.

“We want them to understand that they have a voice, we want to hear from them,” Police Chief Kevin Cornett said. “Anything that is going to impact businesses we want them to be able to come to us and say what they think about it.”

One area resident, who only identified himself as Paul, says the noise ordinance needs to have a balance.

“Obviously, late at night you don’t want people making a lot of noise walking up and down the streets while residents are trying to go to bed, but at the same time this is a vacation spot, so you have to have a little bit on leeway for people to enjoy themselves but also be respectful,” he said.

Cornett says they’re working to find a solution that will work for businesses and residents and increase livability for everyone.

Cornette says noise is a hot topic on the island and he values feedback on this from both residents and business owners.

“Everybody is very much invested in this conversation,” Cornett said. “The city council is taking it very seriously and they are going around and talking to people to get their input. So, I think they are doing a great job on making sure voices are heard so that when we get the final project it’s fair and something that will work for everybody.”

Officers use a calibrated decibel reader when called out to a noise complaint.

“That’s how we determine if it’s a violation and then we would take other factors into account like background noise to keep the realistic approach to is as well,” Cornett said.

The public safety committee has to create a final draft before it will head to the city council for two separate readings.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Whose beach is it? Isle of Palms homeowner, state at odds over unauthorized 'sea wall'

ISLE OF PALMS — Record tides from an unexpected nor'easter in December ripped away several feet of sand on this barrier island, exposing an unauthorized, clandestine wall in front of a beachfront home near Breach Inlet.The wall's unveiling also spawned a power struggle between the state Department of Health and Environmental Control and the Ocean Boulevard homeowner, with the two at odds over property rights and protecting the diminishing shoreline....

ISLE OF PALMS — Record tides from an unexpected nor'easter in December ripped away several feet of sand on this barrier island, exposing an unauthorized, clandestine wall in front of a beachfront home near Breach Inlet.

The wall's unveiling also spawned a power struggle between the state Department of Health and Environmental Control and the Ocean Boulevard homeowner, with the two at odds over property rights and protecting the diminishing shoreline.

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This is all playing out on a sandy beach where waves are clawing closer to multi-million dollar homes amid heavy erosion caused by storms and high tides.

The home at the center of the dispute belongs to Rom Reddy, owner of the multimedia local news outlet MyLo News. After taking a beating from Hurricane Idalia last year, Reddy said he installed the wall as a erosion control barrier and covered it with 30 feet of sand.

The December nor'easter washed away the sand, uncovering the bulwark.

While performing post-storm damage assessments, DHEC became aware of the structure.

Some call it a sea wall, which the state defines as a retaining wall designed to withstand wave forces. Reddy maintains his wall isn't a sea wall, as it was never meant to be exposed to the ocean. It was meant to be buried beneath the sand to protect his home's foundation and yard, he said.

"This keeps my yard stable and keeps it from moving around, which is what a retaining wall does. If we have a catastrophic event, it gives my property some protection, although a very nominal level, because it's not meant to be ocean facing," Reddy said.

Reddy said the nor'easter left the wall tilting and unstable, prompting him to have it rebuilt. In response, DHEC sent a cease-and-desist letter in January to halt the construction.

Cease he did not. Construction on the wall continues to move full steam ahead and shows no sign of slowing down.

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Reddy said it is his right as a property owner to protect his home. The area landward of the setback line is his to do with as he pleases, he said, citing South Carolina's Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands Act.

Not so, according to DHEC's division of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management.

The sand in front of Reddy's property is considered a critical area, the agency said, and any alteration of a critical area requires permits from OCRM, even critical areas that are landward of the jurisdictional setback.

DHEC spokesperson Laura Renwick said the agency regularly issues permits for work in these areas, though it is unlikely Reddy's wall would have been approved.

"Since erosion control structures and devices such as the one identified at this property have been banned per state law since 1988, this structure would not have been permitted," Renwick said.

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Isle of Palms officials said they are aware of the structure, which violates a city ordinance prohibiting hard erosion control measures like sea walls, bulkheads and revetments. But in the case of Reddy's unauthorized structure, the city said its hands are tied. Jurisdiction of that area, and much of the island's critical areas, fall under DHEC, said Mayor Phillip Pounds.

"In this particular case, the OCRM has claimed jurisdiction, so that takes the city out of the mix, and it is up to them to enforce the state-level rules. We are relying on the state to enforce their rules that prevent structures like this being built per their cease-and-desist orders," Pounds said.

Judges in two cases in recent years have sided with homeowners who built walls or placed sandbags along eroding sections of the South Carolina coast.

While Reddy is facing pushback from DHEC, some of his neighbors are behind him. Paul Jorgensen, who owns the property adjacent to Reddy, said he doesn't love what is being erected next door, but he understands his neighbor's mindset. Working with the city and the state to get approval for protective measures has left him feeling frustrated.

"The city and the state have been utterly horrible at handling the situation. Not only have they been utterly horrible at managing, they won't even let us help ourselves," Jorgensen said.

Jorgensen said the preventative measures the city does take on aren't enough.

Ongoing restoration and protection efforts on the island include continuing sand scraping and sandbag placements on the island that began under an emergency order following Hurricane Idalia in September. City Council gave the efforts a boost in October, allotting $1.25 million to continue sand scraping along the beaches to rebuild the dunes. Council also budgeted $250,000 for installing sandbags on properties within 20 feet of erosion areas.

"The city and the state are not doing nearly enough, and, in fact, are preventing homeowners from protecting our own property," Jorgensen said.

South Carolina hasn't allowed structures like Reddy is building since enacting the Beachfront Management Act in 1988, citing a "false sense of security" the measures give to beachfront property owners while simultaneously aiding in further erosion.

Structures like sea walls block the ability of a wave to break naturally, pushing its force onto adjacent properties. The energy bounces back off of the wall, pulling the sand and eroding the beach on the seaward side. Emily Cedzo, director of conservation programs and policy for the Coastal Conservation League, said softer measures for preventing erosion, like sand fencing and larger restoration projects, are ideal for protecting beaches.

"Those are really the ideal ways to manage a beach responsibly so that it can provide good protection for private properties, but also public access and wildlife habitat," Cedzo said.

With multiple cease-and-desist directives, DHEC could begin to dole out fines or penalties.

"When DHEC identifies violations of applicable state laws or regulations, the agency has the authority to initiate an enforcement process that may result in the issuing of a civil penalty to the responsible party, among other actions," Renwick said.

Some think it's time for DHEC to take action.

"I think DHEC is going to have to move forward with enforcement. I don't know what their process or timeline looks like, but I think it's clear that they've already tried to communicate with the property owner," Cedzo said. "I know that several residents on the Isle of Palms are really concerned about it and continue sending reports."

Reddy said the cease-and-desist directives from DHEC won't deter him.

"They have to go in front of a judge and prove to the judge that we're, in fact, breaking the law. And we're ready for that," Reddy said.

Reach Anna Sharpe at 843-806-6790.

New waterfront park coming to Isle of Palms this year

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - The Isle of Palms City Council in 2020 voted to make additions to the marina area of the island and that project is officially slated to be completed this year.The project included the addition of a public dock, a boardwalk and a waterfront park and greenspace. The boardwalk and public dock have been completed, and, as of Jan. 11, the construction contract for the waterfront park and greenspace was officially confirmed.The waterfront park will cover the 300 by 25 foot wide area along the marina faci...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - The Isle of Palms City Council in 2020 voted to make additions to the marina area of the island and that project is officially slated to be completed this year.

The project included the addition of a public dock, a boardwalk and a waterfront park and greenspace. The boardwalk and public dock have been completed, and, as of Jan. 11, the construction contract for the waterfront park and greenspace was officially confirmed.

The waterfront park will cover the 300 by 25 foot wide area along the marina facing the Intracoastal Waterway. There will be a 6-foot wide concrete walkway. The park will include a large lawn area with lush planting.

They plan to include a series of benches along the waterfront walkway so residents can enjoy views of the water and boating activities. There are plans for a circular seat wall near the public dock that would create an entrance to the dock area.

They plan to include a kayak storage area and a kayak launch area. There will be golf cart parking available as well as bicycle parking areas.

All of these plans did require collaboration and participation from the marina manager and restaurant tenants. Scott Toole, the general manager of the Outpost, a nearby restaurant, says he is very excited for this addition to the area.

“I think that it’s an added benefit to the island, to the residents, everybody, to have a space and to use the dock. Kayak launching is a big thing that I think people will take advantage of.” he says. “It’s really going to help make this area kind of a place of interest for people, sort of a destination so to speak, for people to be able to get some food, get some drink, watch the water and use the dock that’s right there.”

Toole says they very recently renovated the Outpost and he’s excited to see this new project bring more people to the area. He says he feels like this area of Isle of Palms is often overlooked as it is a little ways away from the main beach.

“We’ve kind of joked that it’s a small corner of the island and so, anything that’s bringing people down this direction is good for everybody. We’re excited to see this project take place,” he says.

The project is currently slated to be completed by May of this year. To provide City Council your input on this project you can click here.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Isle of Palms homeowner’s ‘sea wall’ sparks controversy over property owner rights

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCBD) — As sea levels rise and strong storms impact coastal areas across the country, a battle is brewing on the Isle of Palms over what homeowners can do to protect their properties.One beachfront homeowner on the island, Rom Reddy, has taken matters into his own hands by building a wall that he says is protecting his property near Breach Inlet from beach erosion.This comes after Tropical Storm Idalia hit the Lowcountry coast in August 2023 and a lot of the beach behind homes on the Isle of Palms dis...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCBD) — As sea levels rise and strong storms impact coastal areas across the country, a battle is brewing on the Isle of Palms over what homeowners can do to protect their properties.

One beachfront homeowner on the island, Rom Reddy, has taken matters into his own hands by building a wall that he says is protecting his property near Breach Inlet from beach erosion.

This comes after Tropical Storm Idalia hit the Lowcountry coast in August 2023 and a lot of the beach behind homes on the Isle of Palms disappeared.

For some homeowners, like Reddy, this meant part of their property is now regulated by the state because, under South Carolina law, the Dept. of Health and Environmental Control’s (DHEC) division of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM) oversees critical areas, which includes beaches.

“If Idalia comes in and erodes the property line, they [OCRM] have jurisdiction,” Reddy explained. “Another storm comes in — Nor’easter erodes it further — they have jurisdiction.”

So to avoid losing control of any more of his property, Reddy took action and is building a structure in front of his home aimed at protecting him from further beach erosion. However, DHEC officials said they did not find out about it until a strong storm in December exposed it.

“DHEC investigated, and has since issued the property owner and contractor cease and desist directives related to this unauthorized structure,” the agency said in a statement.

A spokesperson also explained that anything built on critical areas of the coast, like beaches, needs a permit, and erosion control structures have been banned on South Carolina beaches since 1988.

Reddy is in the process of having the structure rebuilt after the storm in December exposed it. He maintains that he is within his constitutional right to protect his property, adding that the wall is landward of the state’s jurisdictional lines known as the setback and baselines that define the beach/dune system.

“So this is a landgrab by the state,” Reddy said. “Where they are saying your property — and it’s just not this — any waterfront property — they say ‘if a storm erodes it, I own it I have jurisdiction — no plants, no bushes, no fences, nothing — I can tell you what to do with it.'”

Rob Young, a geologist and professor at Western Carolina University, said DHEC and OCRM’s regulations are ensuring that everyone’s right to use the beaches is protected.

He explained that DHEC and OCRM have regulatory authorities over the beaches, coastal waters, and the beach/dune system, identified by the setback and baselines which are redrawn every 7-10 years.

“If you are buying an oceanfront property you need to understand what the limitations are and what you can and can’t do,” he explained. “For most beachfront lots in South Carolina that active beach is probably considered or a portion may be private property — but that doesn’t mean you can do whatever you want out there.”

Young said anything an oceanfront homeowner wants to do in the critical areas needs approval.

“This isn’t just a regulation from OCRM this is the Beachfront Management Act, it is the law of South Carolina,” he said.

Young also explained that structures like sea walls are banned from South Carolina beaches because state officials have found they can often do more harm than good.

“One of the reasons we do not permit seawalls is they have impacts on adjacent property owners,” he said. “Just imagine if everybody did whatever they wanted to one lot at a time — it would look terrible and you would have property owner suing property owner.”

Young said if homeowners are concerned about beach erosion, they need to come together and discuss long-term solutions like building dunes, beach nourishment projects, and developing a plan for regular beach nourishment projects.

There is currently a beach renourishment project ongoing near Reddy’s home following the storms in August and December 2023. However, Reddy believes Isle of Palms leaders dropped the ball before then.

“They are supposed to preserve, protect, enhance and renourish these beaches,” he said. “Prior to Idalia, there was not a lick of sand nothing done to this side of the beach since 2017.”

Isle of Palms leaders dispute these claims in a statement to News 2:

“Prior to 2023, the southwest end of the beach had been stable and accretional and only required periodic post-storm emergency berm repairs. The city has monitored this shoreline annually since 2009 and the area in question became highly erosional in 2023 due to numerous storm events and abnormally high tides. As soon as the shoreline eroded to the point that the conditions met the South Carolina regulatory standards to allow emergency work, the city began restoring dunes to provide better protection against structural damage.

The city has assisted with funding major renourishment projects and emergency protective measures. Last year, IOP City Council approved spending up to $1,890,000 to protect the public beach and property through a combination of emergency sand scraping, trucking in beach-compatible sand and placement of sandbags.

The current balance of the Beach Preservation Fund is $8.3M and it grows by approximately $1.8M annually. However, the city is forecasting a total need of almost $30M for beach projects in the next five to six years to be covered between public and private funding efforts.”

City leaders added there are also plans to work with the Army Corps of Engineers on a project that would place around 500,000 cubic yards of sand along the intertidal zone between Breach Inlet and 10th Avenue. They anticipate the project to start in March 2024 and be completed in four months.

However, Reddy is not waiting around for that work to be done.

“Every property owner has the right to protect their property — and no government no one can take it away from us because that’s the supreme law of the land,” he said.

Charleston Beach Foundation asks Isle of Palms, SCDOT to revoke parking plan

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston Beach Foundation is asking the city of Isle of Palms and South Carolina Department of Transportation to revoke current parking plans along beach access points.The group disclosed its concerns in a letter on November 27, claiming the “general public is being denied their constitutional guaranty of equality and privilege.”Isle of Palms City Council put the regulations into place in 2015 with the goal of making the beaches functional and safe.The 2015 parking plan, ame...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston Beach Foundation is asking the city of Isle of Palms and South Carolina Department of Transportation to revoke current parking plans along beach access points.

The group disclosed its concerns in a letter on November 27, claiming the “general public is being denied their constitutional guaranty of equality and privilege.”

Isle of Palms City Council put the regulations into place in 2015 with the goal of making the beaches functional and safe.

The 2015 parking plan, amended in 2017, cost $250,000 in taxpayer dollars and is modeled off similar plans in both Charleston and Columbia.

The city claims the plan was made to manage “unbridled growth” in the region, both nearby in Charleston and further out in the Lowcountry.

Activists say it does not match up with the increase in commercial use of the island or overall population growth.

“Revoke the 2015 parking plan on Isle of Palms, return all residential-only parking spaces on both Sullivans Island and Isle of Palms back to the general public,” Michael Barnett says.

Barnett says the plan eliminated a number of free spots and instead gave them to short-term rentals in nearby neighborhoods.

The Charleston Beach Foundation also claims the area has since become a hot spot for commercial use, with the city voting in a referendum on Nov. 7 to not limit short-term rental licenses.

“They were really the first to do it. They started to do it piece by piece, which really got my attention because I was a surfer,” Barnett says. “Businesses are operating in these areas. Not basically, they are. They’re not residential neighborhoods anymore.”

City officials weighed in on the matter.

“We are very much a residential community. Certainly, in season, we have a lot more visitors than we do residents. But we provide eight times the among of parking required by the state,” Isle of Palms Mayor Phillip Pounds says.

Pounds says the island offers an abundance of free parking with the current plan, scattered around 56 beach access points.

“It’s not about increasing revenues, being punitive. It’s about making sure every spaces available can be used properly.”

The foundation mentioned encroachment and “excessive fines” as to why the plan should be reworked.

“Why would a parking ticket for parking in a residential area, or having your tires on the road, be 3x the state average on Isle of Palms?” Barnett says.

Pounds says the plan is set in place for now.

“We can’t do anything without approval and oversight, and we have a really good relationship with SCDOT. If there were any changes we were looking to make, we’d certainly have to work in conjunction with them,” Pounds says.

The SCDOT and Isle of Palms City Council both say they are starting the initial review process for the Charleston Beach Foundation’s request.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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