Home Inspection in Johns Island, SC

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As the most trusted home inspection company in Johns Island, I know that purchasing a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. That's why choosing the right home inspector is so important - because you want to know that your new home is in good shape. With PGR Home Inspections, you can be certain you're making the right purchasing decision.

Unlike some home inspectors in Johns Island, SC, I inspect from attic to crawl and wall to wall, while educating my clients throughout the home inspection process. Because a thorough home inspection ultimately depends on the inspector's dedication and effort, I make it my goal to put forth the maximum amount of effort to keep you aware and informed.

As a certified, licensed professional, I provide all of my clients with an unbiased third-party opinion, regardless of whether they are buyers, sellers, or real estate agents. Once we're finished, I will send you an in-depth, educational inspection report to help you make an educated decision about your sale or purchase.

With PGR Home Inspections on your side, you will build your knowledge and achieve peace of mind during the most stressful times.

Here's how:

  • Investigative home inspection approach
  • Thorough, detailed inspection reports that are returned to you quickly
  • Fully trained, certified and licensed
  • I offer several home inspection services for buyers, sellers, and real estate professionals
  • Easy online scheduling so that you meet your due diligence deadline
  • Competitive pricing
  • Friendly, helpful, and ready to exceed expectations

Service Areas

Home Inspection Johns Island, SC

What is a home inspection?

Think of a home inspection like an annual check-up at with your doctor. Home inspections are used to ensure that everything is working correctly in your home - from your sinks and appliances to your windows and roof. A great home inspection will help shine a light on concerning issues located inside and outside your home, which may affect your quality of life.

Home inspections are also helpful for spotting potential risks that may cause concern down the line. When we send you your home inspection report, you will have a much better idea of any problems that are present in your home. Included in your report are recommended repairs and suggestions on what actions to take as your home ages.

Because different circumstances require different types of home inspections, we offer several choices to cater to your needs:

General Home Inspections in Johns Island

You've heard it before - "A man's house is his castle." It is a place of peace, relaxation, and privacy. However, the steps leading up to your new purchase can be exhausting, expensive, and stressful. After all, when you buy a home, you're investing in your family's future. That is why I believe that having an unbiased general home inspection (or buyer's inspection) is an investment all on its own.

Our goal is to keep you informed and aware of all the components in your new home. In fact, I encourage you to be present and ask questions during your inspection. That way, you can walk into your closing with confidence, knowing you are making an informed purchasing decision. When you hire PGR for your general home inspection, know that I am here for YOU. We will spend as much time as needed to explain our findings and answer any questions that you may have about your buyer's home inspection in Johns Island, SC.

After I have inspected your home from bottom to top, you will receive your report that includes high-quality color photos depicting our findings the same day.  Should you have questions relating to your report, simply give me a call after thoroughly reviewing it. At PGR Home Inspections, I strive to make this an enjoyable, informative experience that expands your knowledge and helps you understand building science.

Our general home inspections include:

  • Unbiased top-to-bottom home evaluation, including hard-to-reach areas like crawlspaces and attics.
  • Confirmation that all your utilities are in working order, like gas, electrical, and water.
  • Verification that your crawlspace is accessible, and all livable areas may be accessed. This includes your electrical panel, water heater, HVAC system, and attic hatch.
  • Reports delivered same day that detail any issues within your house and its systems or components.
  • Free thermal imaging
  • On-site wrap-up with plenty of time to answer your questions

Pre-Listing Home Inspections in Johns Island, SC

When you're selling your home, few things are as frustrating as a deal falling through due to maintenance issues. All too often, deals fall through because the buyer's inspector finds a significant issue that could have corrected earlier. Having a pre-listing inspection (or a seller's inspection) puts the control back in your hands. With a pre-listing inspection, you can get prepared for your sale by revealing any major defects in your home that need repairing. Having a pre-listing inspection saves you money, time, and reduces your overall stress levels in the long run.

By completing a pre-listing inspection, you can take as much time as you need to decide which repairs will increase your home's value the most. That way, you get the highest return on investment. By making these repairs on your own time, you can sift through several repair estimates and choose the one makes the most sense for your budget.

As you enter negotiations, you may present your pre-listing inspection as a token of good faith to interested buyers. Sharing your seller's inspection with potential buyers lets them get a look at the condition of your home. More importantly, it will let the buyer know how much money and work you have put into fixing your home's defects, which helps warrant your listing price.

If you want to reduce the time it takes for negotiations, save yourself money, and get the best price for your home, a pre-listing home inspection is a wise choice.

The benefits are endless when you hire PGR to complete a seller's inspection:

  • Boost the chances of selling your home at a price that you can feel good about
  • Manage any pre-existing defects or problems
  • Put negotiating power back in your hands during closing
  • Enjoy a smoother closing process
  • Shorten the time it takes for funds to reach escrow

11th Month Home Inspection in Johns Island, SC

If you're thinking of having a new construction home built, it's easy to understand why. New homes are often more energy-efficient, come with all-new systems and appliances, and can be customized to your exact preferences. Buying a new home also means you won't have to make repairs or deal with the wear and tear that most older homes have. However, new construction homes aren't always perfect. So, when your home is finished, and your builder explains the one-year warranty on their work, it's wise to schedule an 11th month home inspection.

Much like a general home inspection, I take an investigative, non-invasive approach when we inspect your newly built home. I will evaluate all visible and accessible areas of your new construction home to spot any potential issues. I even use thermal imaging at no extra cost to you.

When I have completed your 11th month inspection, you will receive a shorter, comprehensive inspection report with color photos and information on any defects we discover. You may take this valuable information to your builder, who can then make any repairs necessary before your warranty expires. That way, any repairs needed are done on the warranty company's time.

Additional benefits of an 11th month home inspection from PGR include:

 Home Inspector Johns Island, SC
Fix Defects at No Cost

Homebuilders are aware that new construction homes can have defects. After all, there are many hands involved in building a house, including subcontractors you never meet. Because some flaws aren't obvious during the first year of living in a home, having an 11th month home inspection is a great way to protect yourself and your investment.

Prevent Unwelcome Surprises

When you assume that your newly constructed home is void of defects, you could be setting yourself up for some nasty surprises down the line. For example, issues with your new home's systems might not reveal themselves until they malfunction. You will have to cover repair costs in cases like this because the builder's warranty has already expired. With PGR's 11th month inspections, I will ensure that your home's structure systems work properly. If they're not, you will have ample time to have any defects fixed before your warranty is up.

More Time to File Claims

When you schedule your 11th month home inspection at the start of the last month of your warranty, you will have more time to submit a warranty claim. If you choose to wait until a few days before your warranty expires, you will be rushing to file a claim before your new home's warranty expires.

 Property Inspection Johns Island, SC

The PGR Home Inspections Difference

At PGR Home Inspections, I am proud to be the most reliable, thorough, unbiased home inspector in Johns Island, SC. I believe in working hard and treating our customers right, by giving them an in-depth look at their home to make knowledgeable decisions with confidence. I believe in working hard and treating our customers right by giving them an in-depth look at their homes to make knowledgeable decisions with confidence. When you allow me to serve you, I aim to exceed your expectations by inspecting "Attic to Crawl and Wall to Wall", while walking you through our inspection process step-by-step.

Ready to get started?

We're ready to get to work!

Give me a call today at 843-789-0653 with your questions. When you're all set, you can go online to
schedule your Johns Island home inspection

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Traffic relief coming soon to drivers of Johns Island

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County leaders have been working to improve traffic congestion on Johns Island and the area of Maybank Highway and River Road will soon be much easier to travel on.The county has been working on improvements to Maybank Highway since 2004 and will soon have the third and final phase of these improvement projects completed. P...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County leaders have been working to improve traffic congestion on Johns Island and the area of Maybank Highway and River Road will soon be much easier to travel on.

The county has been working on improvements to Maybank Highway since 2004 and will soon have the third and final phase of these improvement projects completed. Pitchfork Road connects Fenwick Hall Alle to River Road and will serve as an alternative route to Maybank Highway.

Drivers traveling from James Island to Johns Island will be able to bypass the light at Maybank Highway and River Road by using the new Pitchfork Road. This will also apply to drivers coming in the opposite direction. This road can be used as an alternate route to get to James Island. Pitchfork Road will be officially open for use on the afternoon of March 25 and county leaders encourage everyone to use it.

Construction on Pitchfork Road began in 2022 and leaders are excited to host a ribbon-cutting ceremony to commemorate the official opening of the road. This will take place on March 25.

County Construction Project Manager Sheila Parker says that they are really looking to improve safety and relieve traffic in the area.

“I think the people in general are looking forward to, you know, new infrastructure come into John’s Island to help alleviate traffic. We see, you know, development coming and so we need the infrastructure to really accommodate all that,” Parker says.

Parker says that the county has recently made some other changes to the intersection of Maybank Highway and River Road to further improve the flow of traffic.

“We recently restriped Maybank at the intersection of Maybank and River Road, really to accommodate more storage to the left turn lane,” she says. “Previously the left turn lane would stack up with cars and it would block the through lane going straight and so, that would cause traffic backups. Now with more storage, the left turn lane traffic flow improves, and more people can get into the left turn lane.”

Parker says that all of this work is to benefit the residents and drivers of the community and to make traveling on these roads a little easier.

“It’s great to see headway and, you know, the improvements are coming slowly but surely. We’re looking to relieve traffic and improve safety of this area. This has been a big focus for the county,” Parker says.

The county has some safety improvements coming to River Road soon as well. Crews will be working on the addition of reflective markings and rumble strips to the road. This work will lead to some nighttime closures on River Road from Main Road to Maybank Highway. This will take place from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. Sunday through Friday for about the next two weeks.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Charleston city councilman looking at ways to alleviate traffic on Johns Island

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Balancing development and existing infrastructure is an issue Charleston County and city leaders are facing.Ask any John's Island residents their main complaint and they will likely tell you traffic.Charleston city councilman for District 3, Jim McBride, is brainstorming ways to alleviate the stop-and-go drive on and off the island.On Maybank Highway, two lanes are coming onto Johns Island and only one going off towards James Island.Read more:...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Balancing development and existing infrastructure is an issue Charleston County and city leaders are facing.

Ask any John's Island residents their main complaint and they will likely tell you traffic.

Charleston city councilman for District 3, Jim McBride, is brainstorming ways to alleviate the stop-and-go drive on and off the island.

On Maybank Highway, two lanes are coming onto Johns Island and only one going off towards James Island.

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Councilman McBride said it's a bottleneck and taxpayers are sitting in traffic, wasting time and money.

There are three projects in the works.

McBride said the first project that will alleviate this problem is the Northern Pitchfork, which is expected to be finished in March.

It will allow motorists to take a right coming onto the island at the fairly new stoplight near Fenwick Hall Allee and take them to River Road, meaning no one has to sit on Maybank.

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The second project is restriping Maybank Highway near the intersection of River Road.

Right now, there are short turn lanes and McBride said cars get backed up, slowing traffic coming onto the island.

He said after the striping, there will be a left turn lane only. The middle lane will be three lanes and a new right turn lane will be added.

The third planned project is the nearly $30 million Southern Pitchfork, creating a possible left turn when you come onto Johns Island.

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The traffic light for the Northern Pitchfork would potentially be moved and realigned with the entrance to the Southern Pitchfork closer to the bridge.

"If that gets funded, and if that happens, the estimated completion time would be somewhere somewhere around 2028," McBride said. "I don't want to wait for four years and no one on the island wants to wait for four years. So, we're trying to come up with some ideas to improve things before that."

McBride said these projects will allow traffic to flow better coming onto the island, but there is nothing funded now to help people get off the island.

"Every single morning taxpayers are sitting in traffic wasting money wasting time," McBride said. "And it's a problem that needs to get fixed."

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One idea McBride is researching is reversible lanes.

With reversible lanes, the middle lane would switch directions in the evening, potentially alleviating traffic.

"In the morning you have two lanes going off the island, and then in the evening, you'd have two lanes coming on the island," McBride said.

McBride said it would require large signaling and possibly entry gates to make it very clear which direction people would drive.

"In 2019, the county did a study on this idea, and they determined that it would improve traffic going off the island in the morning by 66%. That's a huge improvement," McBride said.

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McBride said the county recommended they could not do reversible lanes because currently there are too many stop lights too close together.

He said if the Northern Pitchfork is realigned with the future Southern Pitchfork, there would be one intersection closer to the bridge which would create a more continuous stretch of road, potentially allowing this idea to work.

McBride said the reversible lane idea would cost about $5 million.

"In comparison, the Southern Pitchfork is estimated to be about $30 million. So, $5 million is a lot of money, but it will save taxpayers so much money over time and save time. Instead of sitting in traffic you know, wasting time and gas money," McBride said.

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This is just one idea McBride is researching.

He said he is working alongside Mayor William Cogswell, city staff, and county council members Jenny Honeycutt and Joe Boykin to find a solution for Johns Island traffic.

River Road and Maybank Highway are state-owned, meaning they are managed and funded by the county.

McBride said this requires collaboration between the city and county.

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This November, the county will vote on a 2024 Half Cent Sales Tax Referendum to potentially replace an old sales tax set to expire in the next 2 years.

McBride said it would raise an estimated $5.4 billion.

He said $2 billion would help fund the Mark Clark Expressway, and the other $3.4 billion would help fund the County Infrastructure Improvement Projects.

Letters: Johns Island must balance rural life, new developments

The vast majority of Johns Island is rural. Expanses of farms, equestrian trails, hunting, wildlife and tree canopies draw visitors worldwide. This makes Johns Island one of a kind.It is the reason I moved back here after 30 years of visiting yearly to restore my soul.The urban growth on Maybank has drawn wonderful businesses and world-class...

The vast majority of Johns Island is rural. Expanses of farms, equestrian trails, hunting, wildlife and tree canopies draw visitors worldwide. This makes Johns Island one of a kind.

It is the reason I moved back here after 30 years of visiting yearly to restore my soul.

The urban growth on Maybank has drawn wonderful businesses and world-class restaurants, making Johns Island a destination.

Johns Islanders have worked to maintain this balance by coming together to collaborate with local government and other partners to create and implement tools, including the urban growth boundary and rural zoning districts.

These actions have helped Johns Island avoid the fate of becoming a cookie cutter community and keep its special natural rural beauty, culture and ecosystem intact.

This comes with a constant awareness of new developments and a vigilant effort to maintain and preserve the balance of this way of life for future generations.

If we are not intentional in future development, our beloved islands will soon be destroyed.

Some believe extending Interstate 526 will solve this. But I believe it will only bring more traffic that could destroy the wildlife, ecosystem and uniqueness of Johns Island.

Island residents still have the opportunity to maintain a balance of rural and urban areas. Extending I-526 would irreparably tip the scales.

ROBIN DYESS

Johns Island

The Dec. 16 commentary by Sara Hazzard, president and CEO of the South Carolina Manufacturers Alliance, is about union Grinches.

But it might be titled, “There is no joy in Mudville — mighty Casey has struck out,” from the poem, “Casey at the Bat,” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer. The poem is about Casey’s overconfidence when he strikes out. He let two pitches fly by as strikes before missing the next pitch.

Right-to-work states are swinging and missing the ball. Labor unions were created in order to help workers with work-related difficulties such as low pay, unsafe or unsanitary working conditions, long hours and other situations.

Unions bring higher wages for the lowest-paid workers.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ annual report on union membership published last January, “Workers who are members of labor unions in the U.S. make 18% more than their nonunion counterparts.”

Which group would you want to be part of?

NANCY ZETTLER

Mount Pleasant

Thank you for Mark Powell’s delightful New Year’s commentary, “Firsts on the First: A quiz for New Year's Day.”

This reminded me of the power of mind over matter, especially the comments on cigarette commercials being banned when President Richard Nixon signed legislation.

It’s been 54 years, and I can still hear the jingle, “Winston tastes good like a cigarette should.”

How pitiful for the child who heard that, believed it and stayed hooked on nicotine for 30 years.

I haven’t smoked in more than 30 years.

Now if we could just get legislation to ban beer commercials, we would have a less drugged America. No one wants to believe alcoholics start with a first taste of beer. I, for one, know better.

“This Bud’s for you.”

To a happy, healthier new year.

SUE GEORGE

Summerville

To submit a letter to the editor, send an email to letters@postandcourier.com or fill out the form on our online portal.

Letters can be a maximum of 250 words and are subject to editing for clarity, tone and libel. They must carry the writer’s name and address for publication and a daytime telephone number for verification.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Johns Island woman receives keys to new home from Habitat for Humanity

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A woman neighbors describe as a staple of the community has a new home thanks to a group of volunteers.Sea Island Habitat for Humanity celebrated another closing on Johns Island Friday, handing over the keys for the second house they completed this year to Clareatha Matthews.Matthews says she has been waiting for this day to come. She previously lived in a trailer right behind her new home for almost 40 years. On average, trailers are only supposed to last 10 to 15 years.Matthews is an active ...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A woman neighbors describe as a staple of the community has a new home thanks to a group of volunteers.

Sea Island Habitat for Humanity celebrated another closing on Johns Island Friday, handing over the keys for the second house they completed this year to Clareatha Matthews.

Matthews says she has been waiting for this day to come. She previously lived in a trailer right behind her new home for almost 40 years. On average, trailers are only supposed to last 10 to 15 years.

Matthews is an active member of the community and has been a resident of John’s Island since 1989. She is involved in multiple Bible studies and has worked at the John’s Island Subway for 20 years now.

“Oh my god today means so much to me. I have been blessed and truly blessed for this day. I have been waiting for this day,” Matthews says.

The project to build her home began in September. When a new homeowner is picked, they are required to work a certain amount of “sweat equity” hours by working with volunteers to help build their own home. Matthews was required to work 300 and volunteers say she continued to come out and work on her house even when her required hours were completed.

“She is just a staple. She is a very active part of this community, and she was also very involved in her habitat sweat equity hours. Continuing to come out and help work on her house even after she finished her hours,” Construction site supervisor Kali Tanguay says.

She also said that they have seen some new homeowners in the past fall short on their hours or not want to commit, but that Matthews went above and beyond.

Her friends and family came out to celebrate and help Matthews move in. Her daughters said their mother worked three jobs when they were growing up and that she never complained. They said that she deserved this greatly.

“We owe our entire life to Habitat for Humanity. It’s very special because my mom is such a dependable, hardworking, and deserving lady and it’s good to see her just totally happy,” Matthew’s daughter, Veronica Huggins, says.

Sea Island Habitat for Humanity completes an average of five to six houses per year and they are hoping to see that number continue to grow.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Vandalism causes 60-gallon diesel spill on Johns Island: Charleston Water System

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Clean-up efforts are underway after vandalism resulted in a 60-gallon diesel fuel spill on Johns Island, officials with Charleston Water System said Monday.The diesel fuel spilled into a stormwater ditch behind homes along Colonel Harrison Drive that leads to the Stono River. Residents initially discovered and smelled the fuel spill over the weekend. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control was called on Sunday to help with the spill.Read more: ...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Clean-up efforts are underway after vandalism resulted in a 60-gallon diesel fuel spill on Johns Island, officials with Charleston Water System said Monday.

The diesel fuel spilled into a stormwater ditch behind homes along Colonel Harrison Drive that leads to the Stono River. Residents initially discovered and smelled the fuel spill over the weekend. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control was called on Sunday to help with the spill.

Read more: "Successful oil spill cleanup in Charleston by Coast Guard, no marine life threats."

“Our contractor cleaned up a portion of the spill, immediately called in a professional environmental remediation company, and notified SC DHEC and the EPA’s National Response Center,” said Mike Saia, Charleston Water System's public information administrator. “It may take several days for them to recapture all remnants of the fuel.”

This is the third instance of vandalism to contractor equipment in recent weeks, and the Charleston County Sheriff's Office is investigating.

“I mean it is a very, in depth vandalism. It's not just a rock through the window. It’s someone who came out here to destroy this 200-something thousand-dollar machine,” said Chad Hunter, owner of Hunter Landworx Construction, the contractor onsite.

Hunter showed up to his Johns Island job site Monday expecting to quickly finish a project he’s been working on since October. Instead, he found his machinery completely vandalized.

“There are wires in there, cut and hidden like that. We wouldn't be able to find it if we didn't see that all the fuel around it, my guys would've gotten in the machine. He put rocks and all in our engine to try to blow the engine up,” Hunter said.

But the damage doesn’t stop there.

Read more: "Suspicion arises over two Colleton County mobile home fires in three days."

The vandalism led to a 60-gallon diesel fuel spill into the surrounding area along the Stono River. Charleston Water System owns the construction project, and its staff says they’ve never seen damage this bad.

“We don't see a lot of vandalism. If we do, it's very, very minor, and easy to repair. But this is a different situation because not only did the person damage the equipment related to the job, but they've also damaged the environment,” Saia said.

Saia said they were able to soak up as much of the liquid fuel as possible and the Coast Guard confirmed to CWS that the spill didn't reach the river.

Now, Hunter must pick up the pieces.

He said the damage to his machine alone will cost a few hundred thousand dollars and his crews are now behind on all their current projects.

“We're out here to clean up somebody's mess as well as take time from our family and slow down the project. I mean, it's hurting everybody, the neighborhood, everything around us is just getting messed up from one person,” Hunter said.

“One hour's worth of work is causing weeks of fix-up.”

News 4 has reached out to CCSO for more information.

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